Hubble — Poem in Pleiades Form


 To celebrate the 21st anniversary of the Hubble Space Telescope's deployment into space, astronomers at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, Md., pointed Hubble's eye at an especially photogenic pair of interacting galaxies called Arp 273. The larger of the spiral galaxies, known as UGC 1810, has a disk that is distorted into a rose-like shape by the gravitational tidal pull of the companion galaxy below it, known as UGC 1813. This image is a composite of Hubble Wide Field Camera 3 data taken on December 17, 2010, with three separate filters that allow a broad range of wavelengths covering the ultraviolet, blue, and red portions of the spectrum.


To celebrate the 21st anniversary of the Hubble Space Telescope’s deployment into space, astronomers at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, Md., pointed Hubble’s eye at an especially photogenic pair of interacting galaxies called Arp 273. The larger of the spiral galaxies, known as UGC 1810, has a disk that is distorted into a rose-like shape by the gravitational tidal pull of the companion galaxy below it, known as UGC 1813. This image is a composite of Hubble Wide Field Camera 3 data taken on December 17, 2010, with three separate filters that allow a broad range of wavelengths covering the ultraviolet, blue, and red portions of the spectrum.

Hubble

Hazy tidal bridge with
hot and bright newborn stars
has lopsided structure
highly warped from the plane.
How this spiral pattern
hauls swaths of blue-jewel stars
hitched to galactic disks.

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Hear this on Sound Cloud

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Written for:

MeetingTheBar: Pleiades

Today, Vandana Sharma prompts us to write a Pleiades Form Poem. This consists of seven lines, each line starting with the same letter as the title. The title is a single word. Preferably it should be about space, which is NO PROBLEM for me.

Image credits: NASA Rose of Galaxies

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About zongrik

For those of you who do not know the handle "zongrik," that would be Bat-Ami Gordin. Most people call me "Tammy." Bat-Ami means "daughter of my nation" in Hebrew. It's a heavy name to carry around. I answer to either name. I also answer to "mama." Some Basic Things about me: Animal lover, mom, poet/writer, dramatic soprano, photographer, teacher/tutor, CERT/Technician and, oh yeah, aerospace engineer. I consider myself "The Astro-Poet." To learn more about the origins of the word "zongrik" see whats-a-zongrik?

Posted on October 16, 2014, in D’verse Poets Pub, Poetry and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 33 Comments.

  1. see i knew you would rock this form…poetry and science…your specialty…
    the spiral galaxies are cool…intriguing…like celestial art…

  2. I love the image you’ve selected and the poem is cool – especially ‘How this spiral pattern /
    hauls swaths of blue-jewel stars’ – brill.

  3. Blue-jewel stars, hitching to galactic disks, that must have been quite a sight ~ Lovely work on the form ~ You are in your element Tammy, smiles ~

  4. Very beautifully written and the image is spectacular. Wow!

  5. I love the bridge usage and the lop-sided structure…very nice.

  6. Blue jeweled stars..that is something worth viewing..:)

  7. Very nice. Wow, has the Hubble been up 25 years already? Amazing. Nice imagery here.

  8. There is a natural poetry in science, and here you’ve turned science into a poem. I’m completely enamored of this. And wow – has it really been 21 years?!

  9. I can hardly believe the Hubble has been in orbit for 21 years now. Again I wonder where does the time go?!! How lovely the image you chose to write of and describe. Nice tribute for our window to distant galaxies!

  10. “haul swaths of blue-jewel stars” fantastic image. I love this poem.

  11. Oh, I love this and what a perfect prompt for you…beautifully executed!

  12. the perfect poem for an astro-poet. I remember when they launched Hubble – how the times flies

  13. Lindo poema , linda imagem , os leitores são transportados á um mundo de sonhos.

  14. How beautiful to see how well it’s done. Your grasp of this and focus on the beauty is impressive. Mixing science and poetry is so nice..

  15. the last two lines are fantastic…a grand image perfectly captivated….

  16. Snakypoet (Rosemary Nissen-Wade)

    Lovely! I like the way your poem moves seamlessly from the technical to the imaginative.

  17. loved the h’s gave the piece passion

  18. Especially enjoy the sound play and visual in this, “spiral pattern
    hauls swaths of blue-jewel stars.” Nice work!

  19. Gorgeous ending: “hauls swaths of blue-jewel stars
    hitched to galactic disks”

  20. Thanks for the science lesson as well as the cool poem.

  21. Of course this was no problem for you! Excellent…love that photo too.

  22. Love that you titled this Hubble – perfectly fitting for this beautiful poem

  23. Nice imagery!

  24. Great to tie it up to the anniversary. Many may not even be aware of Hubble itself! wonderful lines Zongrik

    Hank

  25. Great pic. A science poem is always something welcome.

  26. So very interesting….I love learning new facts and found this so well done. Poem is written so exquisitely that it definitely does justice to the wonder of the photograph.

  27. science is form of poetics for sure, at least in your very capable hands. One asked,” Is there poetry after death?”–another answered, “Hell, death is poetry.”

  28. Ohhhhh. Love this one!

  29. Ha! I didn’t even realized you had done this for a form–it moved very naturally (and galactic ally!) Thanks! k.

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