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Study Red on Green


Red Sunset Over Green Sea

Study Red on Green

drinking wine
basket full of cheese
perfect spring lunch
on the beach

soft iridescence
against a carmine sky
wings reflecting cherry
soaring in the wind

red hot questions
on cool olive sand
volatile lust
in a gust of brine

green ocean spray
choreographed
always in her memory
lines of emptiness

she wants to crush
but in her wicked hands
she holds a green dragonfly
to be caged for life

*****************

This was written and posted for:

dversepoets Play with Color – Posted by Victoria at 

I chose Victoria’s direction : choose two complementary colors (colors that are opposite of one another on the color wheel) and weave them into a single poem and also to choose colors to paint an emotion.

I have studied a lot of color, both pigment and light, so this was fun. Obviously, green and red are complimentary colors. Sometimes the sun looks red, and the sea looks green, thought a picnic under these unique circumstances would be really cool.

I played around with this picture myself.

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Red Time


Red Time

If time were red, could it be mapped? How would we find tomorrow?
Would the surface climb be as steep as Mount Kilimanjaro?
Could we race upon its surface? Or slide down a sheer incline?
Would shadows hide pernicious years when suns won’t rise and shine?
If time were mapped like paths in space, could we go back and forth?
In terms of time, what relates to up/down East/ West, South/ North?
We’ve heard of worm-holes and black holes, where space is brutalized.
In terms of time, will this scheme apply? Can a plan be utilized?
If time were red and twisted, could we share another day,
with someone we love and miss? Could the heartache ever go away?

*************

Written for:


http://sundayscribblings.blogspot.com/  “tomorrow”

Also Posted for:

Theme Thursday

Theme Thursday for November 24, 2011 – TOMORROW

I made the map on MATLAB:

[X,Y] = meshgrid(-8:.5:8);
R = sqrt(X.^2 + Y.^2) + eps;
Z = sin(R)./R;
mesh(X,Y,Z,'EdgeColor','black')
surf(X,Y,Z,'FaceColor','red','EdgeColor','none')
camlight left; lighting phong
xlabel('past');
ylabel('present');
zlabel('future');
whitebg([0.7,0.4,0.6]);
set(gcf,'Color',[0.7,0.3,0.5]);
Plus, I rotated AZ -36  El 58

in the red


Neil Alexander explores light

in the red

you don’t think
it’s going to happen
until it actually does

 count to ten
 in the red
 don't get to mad
 it's in your head

take precautions
take a breath
listen and learn

 count to ten
 in the red
 don't get to mad
 it's in your head

walking to school
running to the store
what did you forget?

 count to ten
 in the red
 don't get to mad
 it's in your head

a kick here
a punch there
it won’t add up

 count to ten
 in the red
 don't get to mad
 it's in your head

************************

A one stop poetry Sunday challenge.  Choose from the works of Photographer Neil Alexander.

http://onestoppoetry.com/2011/07/sunday-photography-interview-neil-alexander-poetry-challenge.html

Sonnet IV


Aunt Fruma and Uncle Toli at KSC

Sonnet IV

(The Jupiter Sonnet)

Dense bubbles in the sky are doughnut holes
Embedded in a crucial fluid jamm’d
Into a violet space; electron moles
Are gaseous atoms racing to get slamm’d
Above. Pure shades of higher thought foresee
Endless sweat on faces cast in plasters;
These glowing swirls of cumulus are three
Dimensional portraits of the masters.
Behind a blue wake trails a yellow ball
A sheet of light speeds through the atmosphere.
The clouds which tumble through the frightful squall
Are color tear drops melting from God’s ear.
Tornadoes overwhelm the Great Red Spot.
From here, that planet is a starry dot.

*********************

This is my most famous sonnet. Written in 1993, it is on display at Kennedy Space Center, in the art gallery, located in the IMAX building. In the picture above, my Aunt and Uncle (mother’s sister) are in front of the painting by which my sonnet is displayed. Notice the little plaque next to my aunt. That’s it.

Posted on:

The Poetry Pantry Is Now Open! – #73

This website has an interesting animation of the storms on Jupiter. It’s also a good example of classical fluid dynamics.

http://www.haydenplanetarium.org/resources/ava/solarsystem/P0413jupispot